Who is Roberto Gualtieri, the new Minister of the Economy: the professor who likes so much at the top of the international financial bodies

Who is Roberto Gualtieri, the new Minister of the Economy: the professor who likes so much at the top of the international financial bodies

MILAN - Roberto Gualtieri is the new Minister of the Economy. Born in Rome in 1966, he is an associate professor of contemporary history at La Sapienza University and vice-director of the Gramsci Institute Foundation. He is the author of numerous books and articles on 20th-century Italian and international history and on the process of European integration.

In the political sphere, he was a member of the Secretariat of the Democrats of the Left between 2001 and 2006, and in 2006 in Orvieto he was co-author of the constituent text of the unborn Democratic Party. Later he was part of the commission of "essays" appointed by Romano Prodi to draft the "Manifesto" of the PD.

It boasts three mandates to the European Parliament (from 2009 to today) and from 2014 the appointment as President of the Commission for economic and monetary problems.

Institutional rebate came from Christine Lagarde, former President of the International Monetary Fund and close to leading the European Central Bank. Lagarde defined "the good of Italy and Europe" as the arrival of Roberto Gualtieri in the Italian economy department.

To avoid any doubt, I want to clarify that I am not the Dario who expresses doubts about the knowledge of the Minister. I take this opportunity to reiterate, once again, the need to identify with name and surname, only the name or pseudonym is misleading.

Roberto Gualtieri (Rome, 19 July 1966) is a political, historical and academic Italian, from 5 September 2019 Minister of Economy and Finance of the Conte II Government, succeeding Giovanni Tria [1]. Since 7 June 2009 he has been a member of the Democratic Party of Europe. [2] In July 2014, he was elected President of the Commission for Economic and Monetary Affairs in the European Parliament. He is associate professor of contemporary history at the University of Rome "La Sapienza" [4] and is deputy director of the Fondazione Istituto Gramsci [5]. He is the author of numerous books and articles on 20th-century Italian and international history and on the process of European integration. He collaborates with several newspapers and magazines, he directed the Annual Report on European Integration for the publisher Il Mulino

Dear Director, you did very well to recall that gentleman who, with a lot of "ignorance" makes unsubstantiated claims. Well, if this page is up to anybody and uninformed risks generating an inappropriate and misleading comparison, putting it on a par with magazines where gossip is king. Good boy.

Dear Dario, whoever you are, you would do well to inform yourself about the political stature in the Minister's international headquarters. Our space for comparison is open to all without censorship, but before writing it is necessary to evaluate well the consequences that could derive from our statements. Thanks